Why Should Hydrocodone Combination Products Be Categorized as CII Drugs?

Published Online: Thursday, January 30, 2014
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In this video, Mary Lynn McPherson, PharmD, professor and vice chair at the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy, explains why hydrocodone combination products should no longer be categorized as Schedule III drugs.
 
This is the eleventh in a series of videos in which Dr. McPherson argues in favor of categorizing hydrocodone combination products as Schedule II drugs, and Jeff Fudin, PharmD, argues against doing so. (Drs. McPherson and Fudin were assigned to take these positions for a session at the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists 2013 Midyear Clinical Meeting in Orlando, and their arguments do not necessarily reflect their personal positions on the issue.)
 
These videos were filmed at the ASHP 2013 Midyear Clinical Meeting in Orlando.

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