Codeine and Rescheduling Hydrocodone Combination Products

Published Online: Tuesday, January 28, 2014
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In this video, Jeff Fudin, PharmD, FCCP, adjunct associate professor at the Albany College of Pharmacy and adjunct assistant professor at the UCONN School of Pharmacy, argues that categorizing hydrocodone combination products as Schedule II could lead to increased prescription of codeine, a much “sloppier” drug that could create problems for patients.
 
This is the tenth in a series of videos in which Dr. Fudin argues against categorizing hydrocodone combination products as Schedule II drugs, and Mary Lynn McPherson, PharmD, argues in favor of doing so. (Drs. McPherson and Fudin were assigned to take these positions for a session at the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists 2013 Midyear Clinical Meeting in Orlando, and their arguments do not necessarily reflect their personal positions on the issue.)
 
These videos were filmed at the ASHP 2013 Midyear Clinical Meeting in Orlando.

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