Tree Bark May Alleviate Pain

FEBRUARY 01, 2005

The bark in Scotch pine trees may help arthritis and pain, according to results of a study reported in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry (December 29, 2004). Scientists at the University of Turku (Finland) identified the anti-inflammatory compounds as phenolics—a class of highly active plant chemicals that have been increasingly linked with beneficial health effects. The researchers made the discovery while searching for healthy plant compounds that may be used to develop functional food products or nutraceuticals. For the study, the researchers examined several preparations from pine bark extract taken from the Scotch pine. The researchers identified 28 compounds, some of which indicated high biological activity.



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