Rule Out White-Coat Hypertension

JULY 01, 2003

Patients who experience a transitory spike in blood pressure (white-coat hypertension) during a doctor?s office visit should not be alarmed. In a study of 57 participants referred to a hypertension clinic, most people who had blood pressure readings of 200 mm/Hg or higher during an office visit actually had much lower blood pressure, according to a report presented last month at the Inter-American Society of Hypertension.

During the study, researchers followed participants whose average systolic blood pressure was at least 200 mm/Hg at office visits. When blood pressure was monitored throughout the day using a device worn on the body, the average systolic pressure was ~151 mm/Hg. Researcher Mihaly Tapolyai, MD, of the Cleve-land Clinic Florida, recommends monitoring patients for 24 hours who present with extremely high blood pressure before starting treatment. Treating white-coat hypertension without confirming that a person does indeed have high blood pressure may cause a person?s blood pressure to fall below normal, he warned.



SHARE THIS SHARE THIS
0
 

The Oncology Care Pharmacist in Health-System Pharmacy 
According to the National Cancer Institute, almost 40% of men and women will be given a diagnosis of some form of cancer in their lifetime.


 

Pharmacy Times Strategic Alliance
 

Conference Coverage
News from the year's biggest meetings


Pharmacist Education
Clinical features with downloadable PDFs


 

SIGN UP FOR THE PHARMACY TIMES NEWSLETTER
Personalize the information you receive by selecting targeted content and special offers.