Racial Disparity in Elder Care Improved by Increased Access

MARCH 01, 2003

Frail, elderly African-Americans experience improved health and lower mortality rates when their access to health care is increased, according to a study conducted at the San Francisco VA Medical Center. In the Program of All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly (PACE), a comprehensive team approach to health care, researchers followed the health status and survival rates of 859 elderly African-American and 2002 elderly white participants.

During the enrollment phase of PACE, the elderly African-American patients scored lower on mental health measures, ability to perform routine tasks, and degree of dementia than did the white patients. After a year of enrollment, the African-American patients had a survival rate of 88%, compared with 86% for the white patients, and were more likely to have improved health status. The 5-year survival rates were 51% and 42%, respectively. Researchers hope that results of the study will lead more communities to adopt the PACE model.



SHARE THIS SHARE THIS
0
 

Marijuana Ingredient Shows Promise in Seizure Reduction

While many states across our nation are engaged in political battles over the recreational use of marijuana, researchers have been busy studying the medical benefits of cannabidiol.


 

Pharmacy Times Strategic Alliance
 

Conference Coverage
News from the year's biggest meetings


Pharmacist Education
Clinical features with downloadable PDFs


 

SIGN UP FOR THE PHARMACY TIMES NEWSLETTER
Personalize the information you receive by selecting targeted content and special offers.