Aspirin May Reduce Ovarian Cancer Risk

Published Online: Wednesday, June 11, 2014
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Women who take aspirin regularly may be at a reduced risk for ovarian cancer, the results of a meta-analysis suggest. The study, published online on February 6, 2014, in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute, analyzed data from population-based studies to help determine the association between the use of aspirin, nonaspirin nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and acetaminophen and the risk of developing ovarian cancer. The results indicated that regular aspirin use was associated with a reduced risk of ovarian cancer. Among 7 studies that reported frequency of use, daily use of aspirin was associated with a 20% decrease in ovarian cancer risk. In 3 studies that included dose information, low-dose aspirin use (less than 100 mg per day) was associated with a 34% reduction in ovarian cancer risk.

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