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Case Studies

Craig I. Coleman, PharmD
Published Online: Monday, January 14, 2013   [ Request Print ]

Case 1
One morning in mid-December, SC comes to the pharmacy counter carrying IC, her 5-year-old daughter, and asks for advice about a children’s sore throat spray. SC tells the pharmacist her daughter has been complaining of a sore throat for the past 2 days. Upon questioning by the pharmacist, IC denies having a runny nose, cough, mouth sores, and/or hoarseness. The pharmacist recommends a 0.5% phenol oral anesthetic/analgesic spray. Prior to leaving, SC asks the pharmacist whether she should bring IC to the pediatrician to have a strep test performed.
Should IC be tested for strep throat?

Case 2
SC (from the previous case) brings her daughter to a pediatrician, who performs a rapid antigen detection test for GAS pharyngitis. The test comes back positive and the pediatrician decides to write IC a prescription for antibiotics. IC has a known penicillin allergy that previously resulted in hives.
What would be the best antibiotic treatment course for IC?

Dr. Coleman is associate professor of pharmacy practice and director of the pharmacoeconomics and outcomes studies group at the University of Connecticut School of Pharmacy
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