Study Examines Teen Sleep Habits

MARCH 01, 2005

A study, reported recently in Current Biology, examined why adolescents go to bed later. Researchers in Germany asked 25,000 individuals (from 8 to 90 years of age) about their sleep and wake times. Based on the participants'responses, the researchers mapped their "chronotypes" (an individual's endogenous or natural circadian clock "synchronises"or alignments to the 24-hour day).

The results of the study indicated that children are early chronotypes and become progressively later during development, reaching a maximum lateness around age 20, when they become earlier again. A comparison of men and women showed that women reached their maximum lateness earlier (19.5, compared with 20.9 years in men). The results further suggested that women mature faster than men.



SHARE THIS SHARE THIS
0

Conference Coverage from ASHP Summer 2017 

Four years after they first launched the Summer Meetings in Minneapolis, Minn., the ASHP 2017 Summer Meetings and Exhibition was in Minneapolis once again.  

 

Pharmacy Times Strategic Alliance
 

Pharmacist Education
Clinical features with downloadable PDFs


Next-Generation Pharmacist® Awards


3rd Annual Convenient Healthcare and Pharmacy Collaborative Conference


SIGN UP FOR THE PHARMACY TIMES NEWSLETTER
Personalize the information you receive by selecting targeted content and special offers.