Surgical Procedure Helps Urinary Incontinence

DECEMBER 01, 2004

Marcella Roenneburg, MD, an expert on the treatment of urinary incontinence in women, said that as women become more active and live longer there are more complaints of urinary incontinence and prolapse. There are surgical solutions that can cure the problem, however. One surgical solution uses tissues harvested from a woman's own body.

Urinary incontinence is a common problem as women age, according to Dr. Roenneburg. "The supporting structure in the pelvis, ligaments, and fascia that support the uterus, bladder, and rectum become weakened," she said.

In some women, fascia harvested from the leg can be used to fix frayed or torn fascia, creating a stronger and longer-lasting repair. Fascia in the abdomen also can be harvested. "It's a very thick, very fibrous, very tough tissue. You transplant it into the vagina under the bladder to support things. Because it's your own tissue, there's no rejection problem and it heals very well," she added.



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