Consuming Fruit, Not Fat, Staves Off Weight Gain

Susan Farley
Published Online: Friday, October 1, 2004

The results of a long-term study, published recently in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, showed that people who increased their fruit consumption did not put on as much weight and body fat as those who decreased their fruit consumption. The benefit of this study is that it provides evidence over 6 years. Whereas the findings reiterate public health recommendations that adults should eat more fruits and vegetables as well as cut down on fats, they also refute the claims of high-fat, Atkins-style diets.

Researchers followed 248 adults as they kept a food journal at the beginning of the study and again at the end of the 6 years. The results showed that those who had increased their fruit intake by the time of the second study gained less weight than those who had decreased their fruit intake. It is important to note that fruit intake consisted of whole fruits, not fruit juices. In addition, those who had increased their consumption of skim or low-fat milk experienced less of a weight gain. According to the study authors, those who ate less fruit had a higher overall caloric intake.

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