Race Should Not Determine Drug Therapy

SEPTEMBER 01, 2004

When deciding the appropriate course of treatment for high blood pressure, race should not be a major criterion for selecting a therapy, according to a study reported in Hypertension (June 2004). Using data collected during a clinical trial of 1 type of blood pressure lowering drug?the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor quinapril?the researchers determined the influence of race on blood pressure response.

Although blood pressure lowering with quinapril treatment was, on average, greater for Caucasians than African Americans, the response varied for both groups, and the range overlapped substantially. The researchers noted that age, obesity, and gender accounted for a majority of racial differences in response to the quinapril treatment. "The results of these analyses highlight the potential pitfalls of comparing blood pressure responses between race groups without adequate adjustment for a range of potential confounding variables," concluded the researchers.



SHARE THIS SHARE THIS
0

Conference Coverage

Check back here regularly for live conference coverage from the American Academy of Pain Medicine and the upcoming American Pharmacists Association Meeting and Expo. 


Pharmacy Times Strategic Alliance
 

Pharmacist Education
Clinical features with downloadable PDFs


Next-Generation Pharmacist® Awards


3rd Annual Convenient Healthcare and Pharmacy Collaborative Conference


SIGN UP FOR THE PHARMACY TIMES NEWSLETTER
Personalize the information you receive by selecting targeted content and special offers.