Pharmacy Week in Review: Giant Cell Arteritis Rates Not Associated with Race, Trial Evaluates Vaccine for Allergic Reactions to Bee Stings

2019-08-23 08:54:00
Tags: week in review,specialty pharmacy


This weekly video program provides our readers with an in-depth review of the latest news, product approvals, FDA rulings, and more. Our Week in Review is a can't miss for the busy pharmacy professional.

Transcript

Hello and welcome to the Pharmacy Times News Network. I’m Nicole Grassano your host for our Pharmacy Week in Review.

Pharmacy Times will be on location in Boston next week to deliver coverage on the National Association of Chain Drug Stores’ Total Store Expo. The meeting aims to give industry leaders new insights into the industry and evolving marketplace, so that owners and employees can chart a successful course for their companies. “Community Pharmacy-Based Point-of-Care Testing,” “NACDS Institute Exploring Specialty Drugs,” and “Community Pharmacy’s Role in Optimizing Medication Use” are just a few of the sessions to look out for in our upcoming coverage. Stay tuned for interviews with leaders in the field as they discuss topics such as the future of CBD, technology and the future of pharmacy, and opportunities for chain pharmacy in preventive care. Keep an eye out for updates on PharmacyTimes.com, in our daily e-newsletters, and on our social media channels: Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

Researchers in Australia have successfully completed a human trial for a vaccine that could effectively eliminate the risk of severe allergic reactions to European honeybee stings, Contemporary Clinic reported. The trial took place at Flinders University and the Royal Adelaide Hospital, and included 27 adults with a history of allergic reactions to bee stings. The vaccine itself contains a unique sugar-based ingredient called the Advax adjuvant, which can help the body neutralize the bee venom at a faster rate. According to study authors, the Advax adjuvant has now been successfully given to more than 1000 individuals across a range of vaccines, including those in the current bee sting allergy trial. Although a commercial bee venom therapy is already available, it requires patients to receive more than 50 injections during a 3-year period in order to build up their immune systems.

Rates of giant cell arteritis are not affected by race between African-American and white patients, Specialty Pharmacy Times reported. Despite its clear association with advancing age, GCA’s exact link with different ethnic and racial groups is unknown, as most epidemiological data on GCA are derived from predominately white populations in Europe. The researchers conducted a retrospective review to assess the histopathologic reports and medical records of all patients who underwent temporal artery biopsy at Johns Hopkins Wilmer Eye Institute from 2007 to 2017. Biopsy results and demographic data, including age, gender, and self-reported race, were tabulated. The researchers also found that white patients had a higher pretest probability of disease, with 19.6% of those tested having BP-GCA compared with 8.4% of African-American patients, suggesting a greater need for surveillance of the African-American population or stronger link between symptoms and disease in the white population.

Pharmacists may get more questions about Eucrisa, if patients have seen a recent commercial for the prescription medication. In the spot, called “Bodyguard,” the narrator says that Eucrisa can be used almost everywhere, working at or below the skin to block overactive PDE4 enzymes thought to reduce inflammation. According to the commercial, Eucrisa can be used to treat people who suffer from mild-to-moderate eczema when applied regularly as instructed.

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Thanks for watching our Pharmacy Week in Review. I’m Nicole Grassano at the Pharmacy Times News Network.