Commonly Prescribed Acid Reflux Medication Not Helpful for Children With Asthma

Published Online: Friday, July 20, 2012
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Acid reflux is common among children with asthma, and in recent years there has been a dramatic increase in prescriptions of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) for children with asthma. This episode of the JAMA Report discusses a controlled study in which pediatric asthma patients without acid reflux symptoms were given either placebo or a PPI in addition to corticosteroids. The study found that PPI treatment did not improve asthma symptoms and may come with risks, including increased chance of infection.
 
To read our article on the study, click here.

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