Proton Pump Inhibitors Linked to Non-Specific Gastric Inflammation in Children

Published Online: Monday, June 9, 2014
An increased risk of non-specific gastric inflammation is found in children exposed to PPIs for more than 6 weeks.

Exposure to proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) is associated with non-specific gastric inflammation (NSGI) in children, according to a study published in Pediatric Gastroenterology and Hepatology on January 20, 2014. The risk increases if the patient is exposed to a PPI for a period greater than 6 weeks, and significantly increased after 3 months.

For their study, Eduardo Rosas-Blum and colleagues at the University of Texas reviewed 310 endoscopy and biopsy reports of patients who underwent an esophagogastroduodenoscopy between July 2009 and July 2010.

To read the rest of this article, click here.

Latest Articles
Donnie Calhoun, RPh, PD, National Community Pharmacists Association (NCPA) Foundation vice president, discusses how pharmacists can prepare themselves and their business before, during, and after a disaster.
Ken Whittemore Jr, Surescript's senior vice president of professional and regulatory affairs, talks about some new transactions available that can help pharmacists.
In case you got caught up in the Thanksgiving holiday rush, here are the top trending stories you may have missed in November:
Bryan Ziegler, PharmD, executive director of Kennedy Pharmacy Innovation Center, provides some resources for community pharmacists to use when implementing new collaborative services with primary care providers.
Latest Issues