Case Studies

Milan Patel, PharmD; Elizabeth S. Mearns, PharmD; and Craig I. Coleman, PharmD
Published Online: Tuesday, June 17, 2014
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Case 1
AR, a 55-year-old African American man, comes to your pharmacy to fill a new prescription. He tells you that he recently received a diagnosis of primary hypertension from his doctor and was given a prescription for lisinopril 10 mg once daily. He has no other comorbidities, such as diabetes or chronic kidney disease.
As the pharmacist, should you dispense this medication?

Case 2
BF is a 49-year-old man who comes to the pharmacy with a new prescription for flecainide 50 mg every 12 hours. He had recently been released from the hospital for an episode of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (AF) and was discharged with instructions to begin taking flecainide for rhythm control. Upon review of the patient’s profile, you notice he is also on carvedilol, lisinopril, aspirin, and atorvastatin. After talking to the patient, you learn he had a myocardial infarction (MI) a few years ago.
As the pharmacist, do you fill the prescription for this patient?

Dr. Patel is a pharmacist, Dr. Mearns is health economics and outcomes research fellow at Hartford Hospital Evidence-Based Practice Center, and Dr. Coleman is professor of pharmacy practice, as well as codirector and methods-chief at Hartford Hospital Evidence-Based Practice Center, at the University of Connecticut School of Pharmacy.


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