Case Studies

Diana M. Sobieraj, PharmD, and Craig I. Coleman, PharmD
Published Online: Tuesday, September 17, 2013
Case 1
FK is a 68-year-old man who comes to your pharmacy with several new prescriptions. The day before, he was discharged from the hospital, where he spent 2 weeks in the intensive care unit due to sepsis from a complicated exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. You notice one prescription is for omeprazole 40 mg daily, a medication he has never filled before. You ask FK if he had any gastrointestinal problems during his hospitalization and why omeprazole was prescribed. He denies any new health problems and says he is unaware of why this medication was started.
As FK’s pharmacist, what should you do regarding his omeprazole prescription?

Case 2
ML presents with a prescription for metronidazole 500-mg tablets to be taken twice daily for 7 days to treat bacterial vaginosis. She asks how long it will take for the prescription to take effect because she is flying to her sister’s wedding the next day. You begin discussing her prescription and how it will be important to abstain from alcohol while taking metronidazole and for up to 3 days after she is finished with the therapy. ML quickly replies that it won’t be possible to adhere to those restrictions until 2 days from now and that she will plan to start therapy then instead of today.
What alternative therapies could ML’s physician prescribe for her bacterial vaginosis?
Diana M. Sobieraj is assistant professor of pharmacy practice and Dr. Coleman is associate professor of pharmacy practice and director of the pharmacoeconomics and outcomes studies group at the University of Connecticut School of Pharmacy.


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