Case Studies

Joy Meng, PharmD candidate, Elizabeth S. Mearns, PharmD, and Craig I. Coleman, PharmD
Published Online: Thursday, November 14, 2013
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Case 1
RM is a 55-year-old woman who comes to your pharmacy for an influenza vaccination. She works as a nurse in a hospital transplant unit. She is healthy (no acute or chronic conditions) and takes no medications. She recently heard that your pharmacy offers the nasal vaccine FluMist (MedImmune), and she would like to receive it.
As RM’s pharmacist, should you administer the nasal spray vaccination to RM?

Case 2
MC is a 35-year-old Hispanic woman who comes to your pharmacy with a prescription for oseltamivir (Tamiflu, Genentech). She lives with her sister, who was diagnosed with influenza this morning, and has been in close contact with her. MC has never been vaccinated and has a newborn at home. She informs you that she would like to get vaccinated with the FluMist (MedImmune) nasal spray today and have her prescription for oseltamivir filled.
As MC’s pharmacist, do you fill the prescription in conjunction with administering the nasal spray flu vaccine?
Ms. Meng is a PharmD candidate, Dr. Mearns is a health economics and outcomes research fellow at Hartford Hospital Evidence-Based Practice Center, and Dr. Coleman is professor of pharmacy practice, as well as co-director and methods-chief at Hartford Hospital Evidence-Based Practice Center at the University of Connecticut School of Pharmacy.


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