A Pharmacist-Focused Review on Epilepsy: Improving Treatment Outcomes in Partial-Onset Seizures

A. Scott Mathis, PharmD
Published Online: Wednesday, June 19, 2013
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This activity is supported by an educational grant from Eisai Inc.

A Pharmacist-Focused Review on Epilepsy: Improving Treatment Outcomes in Partial-Onset Seizures

A. Scott Mathis, PharmD
Administrative Director
Pharmacy and Medication Use
Pharmacy Department
Monmouth Medical Center
Long Branch, New Jersey



Disclosures

The following contributors have no relevant financial relationships with commercial interests to disclose.

Faculty
A. Scott Mathis, PharmD

Pharmacy Times Office of Continuing Professional Education Planning Staff
Judy V. Lum, MPA, and Elena Beyzarov, PharmD

Pharmacy Times   Editorial Staff
Bea Riemschneider and David Allikas

PTOCPE uses an anonymous peer reviewer as part of content validation and conflict resolution. The peer reviewer has no relevant financial relationships with commercial interests to disclose.


Educational Objectives

Upon completion of the educational activity, the participant should be able to:

1. Examine epidemiology and pathophysiology of various types of seizures in epilepsy, with focus on partial onset seizures
2. Discuss current management of epilepsy, including guidelines and available anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs)
3. Explore the role of newly emerging AEDs in treatment-refractory partial-onset seizures
4. Discuss the role of the pharmacist in educating patients on administration of AEDs and identifying and mitigating AED-related adverse effects and interactions

Target audience: Pharmacists
Type of activity: Knowledge
Release date: June 12, 2013
Expiration date: June 12, 2015
Estimated time to complete activity: 2 hours
Fee: Free

Click here to view this lesson.



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