Self-Management Demonstrated in Migraine Patients

AUGUST 16, 2012
Despite their demonstrated effectiveness, behavioral interventions are infrequently used in the management of migraine headaches.

To evaluate the clinical effectiveness of a webbased intervention designed to improve self-management of migraine symptoms and reduce psychological distress for patients, researchers conducted a randomized, controlled study. Their results were published in the February 2012 edition of Headache.

In the study, patients were randomized in 2 parallel arms; 1 received the web-based intervention and the other did not. The results showed that participants in the intervention group demonstrated improvement in the following areas: decreased stress and depression, increased headache self-efficacy in performing management activities to improve migraine outcome, increased use of relaxation to decrease symptoms, and increased use of social support.

This study suggests that behavioral interventions that improve self-efficacy of the patient can be useful for augmenting pain management of migraine headaches.

To read more articles in this watch, click:
Muscle Relaxants in Rheumatoid Arthritis
Management of Pain Possible for Childhood Vaccinations


SHARE THIS SHARE THIS
0
 

In Seniors: Consider CMV Serostatus
When Recommending Flu Vaccine

Older people who have cytomegalovirus seem to have less robust responses to the trivalent influenza vaccine than those who do not have CMV.


 

 

Conference Coverage
News from the year's biggest meetings


Pharmacist Education
Clinical features with downloadable PDFs


 

SIGN UP FOR THE PHARMACY TIMES NEWSLETTER
Personalize the information you receive by selecting targeted content and special offers.