High Cholesterol May Lead to High BP in Men

FEBRUARY 01, 2006

According to the results of a 14-year study, abnormal levels of total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and the ratio between total cholesterol and HDL are associated with an increased risk of high blood pressure (BP) in men. The results were reported in the January 2006 edition of Hypertension.

The study followed 3110 men between the ages of 40 and 84 with previous cholesterol measurements and no history of cardiovascular or cerebrovascular disease, and who had not been previously treated for high cholesterol. During the 14-year follow-up, 1019 men developed high BP. After controlling for other risk factors, such as age, smoking, and familial history, men with the highest levels of total cholesterol had a 23% increased risk of high BP, compared with men with the lowest cholesterol levels.

Those with the highest levels of cholesterol components, excluding HDL, had a 39% increased risk, and those with the highest ratio of total cholesterol to HDL were 54% more likely to develop high BP.




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