Nighttime Awakenings May Signal Worsening Asthma in Children

Published Online: Friday, November 1, 2002

For children with asthma, waking up during the night could mean that their asthma is getting worse, researchers reported in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. This study of 1041 children showed that 34% were awakened 1 or more nights because of asthma symptoms during the 28-day study period. Children with greater atopy or who had more severe asthma were at greater risk for nighttime awakenings. The risk was also increased among children who were allergic to dog or cat dander and had these pets in their home. Furthermore, children with unstable asthma were also more likely to wake up at night. The authors concluded that children who wake up in the night with asthma symptoms are at risk for severe asthma exacerbations; their symptoms and treatment should be monitored closely.

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