I recently received a prescription...

Author: Martin A. Erickson, III, RPh

    I recently received a prescription for an old product called ?Cor-Tar-Quin 0.25%.? I found that this product is still being made in Mexico, but I was unable to obtain the formula. Can you help?

Click Here For The Answer -----------> [-]

    Cor-Tar-Quin and Cor-Tar-Quin Forte formerly were manufactured by Dome. They were indicated for ?the treatment? of subacute and chronic dermatoses and in dermatitis complicated or threatened with invasion by bacteria, fungi, monilia (Candida), or protozoa.? It usually was applied sparingly once or twice daily to affected areas (Modern Drug Encyclopedia and Therapeutic Index, 1963). The Cor-Tar-Quin product contained hydrocortisone alcohol (hydrocortisone) 0.25%, 0.5%, or 1% and LCD (liquor carbonis detergens, or coal tar solution) 2%, diiodohydroxyquinoline 1% in Dome?s Acid Mantle cream vehicle. The ?Forte? product contained hydrocortisone 0.5%, coal tar solution 10%, and diiodohydroxyquinoline 3% in Acid Mantle.

    Diiodohydroxyquinoline, a light yellowish to yellowish-brown powder that is tasteless, odorless, and not readily wetted with water, also is known as diiodohydroxyquin or iodoquinol USP. It is used as an antiamebic.

    Coal tar solution contains an emulsifier, polysorbate 80, and alcohol, and it is miscible with most vanishing creams. Iodoquinol USP is only sparingly soluble in alcohol and ether and is almost insoluble in water. It is not readily wetted in water. It is used primarily in skin conditions such as eczema and psoriasis. Hydrocortisone has solubility in water at 0.28 mg/mL and in ethanol at 15 mg/mL. It is used topically to treat inflammatory, allergic, and pruritic skin conditions.

    It would be reasonable extemporaneously to compound this formulation by levigating the hydrocortisone and iodoquinol into the vanishing cream base, followed by the coal tar solution. A levigating agent such as propylene glycol may aid the powder levigation process.