Pain Relievers May Raise Risk for Second Heart Attack

Published Online: Wednesday, December 19, 2012
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This podcast, from the University of Kansas Hospital, discusses a study published online on September 10, 2012, in Circulation that indicates that taking nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) after a heart attack may increase one’s risk of having a second heart attack.
 
To download the podcast, click here.
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