Atrial Fibrillation Linked to Depression

Published Online: Tuesday, January 14, 2014
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According to a German study published in PLOS ONE, atrial fibrillation may increase the risk for depression. A large sample of adults were assessed for depression on a scale using the Patient Health Questionnaire. On average, patients with atrial fibrillation scored a point higher on the scale of depression than those without atrial fibrillation. However, these scores were not severe enough to indicate the need for treatment. The study also found that atrial fibrillation patients living without a current partnership had a more prominent history of depression and self-rated their mental health status lower than those without the condition.

To read the full article on HCPLive.com, click here.
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