Proton Pump Inhibitors Linked to Non-Specific Gastric Inflammation in Children

Published Online: Monday, June 9, 2014
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An increased risk of non-specific gastric inflammation is found in children exposed to PPIs for more than 6 weeks.

Exposure to proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) is associated with non-specific gastric inflammation (NSGI) in children, according to a study published in Pediatric Gastroenterology and Hepatology on January 20, 2014. The risk increases if the patient is exposed to a PPI for a period greater than 6 weeks, and significantly increased after 3 months.

For their study, Eduardo Rosas-Blum and colleagues at the University of Texas reviewed 310 endoscopy and biopsy reports of patients who underwent an esophagogastroduodenoscopy between July 2009 and July 2010.

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