Ten Years Running, Pharmacists Ranked in Top Three in Gallup Integrity Survey

Published Online: Monday, December 3, 2012
Follow Pharmacy_Times:
PRESS RELEASE

December 3, 2012

Alexandria, Va. – For the tenth consecutive year, Gallup’s annual Honesty and Ethics survey reveals that pharmacists have ranked in the top three.  In this year’s survey, pharmacists ranked second only to nurses and ahead of doctors, moving up two rankings from last year’s survey. 

The survey, released on December 3, measures the public’s trust of professionals across diverse disciplines, including but not limited to healthcare.

“This year’s Gallup survey further emphasizes that pharmacists truly are the face of neighborhood healthcare, serving as accessible healthcare providers with nearly all Americans living within five miles of a community pharmacy,” said National Association of Chain Drug Stores President and CEO Steven C. Anderson, IOM, CAE.

“Their second place ranking this year illustrates that pharmacists are highly-trusted medical professionals, with a minimum of six years of professional education to receive their degree and license.  Not only do community pharmacists dispense prescription medications, but they also provide a number of health services that help patients improve their health and also reduce healthcare costs,” said Anderson.

“Pharmacists work one-to-one with patients providing medication counseling to help them understand the importance of taking medications as prescribed.  In addition, community pharmacists administer vaccinations, including flu shots as well as other vaccinations, and provide preventive health and education screenings, as well as disease management,” said Anderson.  “Pharmacists are also innovators, working to help electronically integrate health and prescription records, which will help in providing better overall patient care and help reduce administrative costs.”

Related Articles
Joseph Saseen, PharmD, FASHP, FCCP, FNLA, BCPS, CLS, offers 3 pieces of advice to pharmacy students.
Reid Blackwelder, MD, FAAFP, gives his point of view into why some pharmacists and physicians may still see team-based care as novel.
Reid Blackwelder, MD, FAAFP, talks about what it will take to make collaboration between pharmacists and physicians the norm.
Joseph Saseen, professor in the Departments of Clinical Pharmacy and Family Medicine at University of Colorado Skaggs School of Pharmacy, talks about what it meant for him to win the 2014 Education Award from the American College of Clinical Pharmacy.
$vacMongoViewPlus$
Latest Issues
  • photo
    Pharmacy Times
    photo
    Health-System Edition
    photo
    Directions in Pharmacy
    photo
    OTC Guide
    photo
    Generic Supplements
  • photo
    Pharmacy Careers
    photo
    Specialty Pharmacy Times
    photo
    Generic
$auto_registration$